Press "Enter" to skip to content

Archives: microBLOG

Circle of Life

Circle of Life

When we headed down to Escalante this last weekend, it was one of my main goals to try and find this particular pictograph panel. I had seen a photo of this pictograph a while back, and because it was so unique I just new I wanted to find it and see it for myself. I have seen many petroglyphs and pictographs, but nothing like this one before. It’s very interesting that each person around the circle is different from one another…no two are exactly the same.

Unfortunately, I have no clue what style this pictograph is, but if I had to guess it would be from a later culture, after the Fremont/Anasazi were gone from this area. Perhaps it is Ute or Paiute? There is a small rainbow off to the right (just out of the frame) so maybe I am wrong and it is Fremont? If anyone out there has some thoughts or information on this pictograph panel, I’d love to hear them in the comments below.

>> Grand Staircase – Escalante Ruins & Rock Art

Leave a Comment

Sun Carrier

Sun Carrier

The Uinta Basin in Northeastern Utah features some of the finest rock art in Utah and a very distinct subdivision of the Fremont Style known as the Classic Vernal Style. The Sun Carrier panel, also known as The Three Kings panel has been called the greatest petroglyph panel in the world. While that description might be just a little over the top, it absolutely has to be up near the top of that list. This panel is in a very unique location on a sandstone pillar about two-thirds of the way up the cliff from the canyon floor. Not only are the human-like figures very large and lifelike, they are also highly detailed and decorated. It also appears that there is also some red pigment left on the panel, especially on the large sun-like figure and the central human figure. It makes one wonder just how much paint there may have been on this panel when it was created that has weathered away…

I would like to extend my thanks to the McConkie Ranch for allowing the public onto their property so that those of us who enjoy viewing rock art can experience the many fine petroglyphs located here. I encourage anyone who is interested in rock art to make the trip up there to view all the spectacular rock art…you won’t be disappointed!

>> Dry Fork – McConkie Ranch

Leave a Comment

The Harvest Scene

The Harvest Scene

For the last couple of years I have made a list of goals that I wanted to accomplish throughout the year which has helped motivate me to get things done. Near the top of my list for 2011 was to finally get to The Maze District of Canyonlands National Park so that I could visit The Harvest Scene pictographs. I was able to secure a campsite permit in April and spent four days and three nights in the Land of Standing Rocks with a couple good friends. Our first full day was spent hiking to The Harvest Scene and it was an incredible experience. This panel is pretty faded and very hard to see in direct sunlight, but fortunately while we were there a few clouds blocked the sun for us and I was able to admire and photograph this impressive panel. The photo above shows only part of the panel, but it’s the part where the name ‘Harvest Scene’ derives. I find the larger anthropomorphic figure on the left with white stripes to be very unique, but my favorite figure is the large one on the right with the outstretched arm. If you look closely at the middle finger on it’s hand, it appears there is ricegrass growing from the tip. On either side of the ricegrass this are small zoomorphs; the left one appears to be a bird and the right one a rabbit. I really enjoyed visiting this site and am planning on hopefully returning again sometime next year and hiking to it from The Maze Overlook.

You can click on this photo and view a larger size on Flickr if you want to see the finer details better.

>> Pictograph Fork & The Harvest Scene

Leave a Comment

The Hitchhiker

The Hitchhiker

‘The Hitchhiker’ is a surprisingly well preserved Barrier Canyon Style anthropomorph hidden in a remote canyon of southern Utah. It’s part of a larger pictograph panel known as The Perfect Panel because of it’s amazing state of preservation. It’s obvious where the nickname ‘hitchhiker’ comes from while looking at this figure, but if you look closely at the ‘extended’ thumb you will notice that the finger is shorter than the other fingers. There is actually a small zoomprph figure right below the thumb that makes it look longer if you don’t pay close attention to the details. This anthropomorph also has a highly stylized ‘attending dog’ type figure on it’s shoulder.

The Perfect Panel is probably the most elaborate and best preserved pictograph panel I have had the pleasure of visiting so far. I will definitely be posting more photos from this panel in the future!

>> From the Maze to the Mesa

Leave a Comment